Outsmarting Anxiety: How Jews Avoid Counseling Through Spirituality

 

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Even before there were experiments and scientific findings, ancient teachers and rabbis have explored the limitations and possibilities of the human mind – whether individuals can communicate and connect with an expansive, heightened the degree of reality that has gotten over the brain’s dissatisfied, worried initial reaction to daily encounters.

 

These kinds of suggestions and ideas were established thousands of years ago, and until now, there are still impactful indications that those who led the Great Assembly incessantly discussed such knowledge. Because of this belief, the Jews, through their spirituality, have found ways on how to entirely avoid counseling and outsmart their anxiety.

 

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Anxiety Limits Life

Anxiety is that foreboding, crumbling, twisting feeling inside of you, that makes the body and mind react negatively and fearfully over something that may or may not have happened or will never happen. Anxiety is either you’re stressing out about something that you said or did in the past, or expecting something that’s supposed to happen in the future, mostly negative ideations and outcomes.

 

Anxiety, in a way, is helpful if utilized for safety like being extra cautious when crossing the street or studying late at night to avoid failing in your exams. However, anxiety becomes a considerable problem when it starts interfering with your life and daily routines like refusing to do things that are vital to your existence.

 

Reconnect Using Wonder

Historical teachers and rabbis have suggested before, which remains certain until this day, that people can outmaneuver their discontented, worried minds through frequent reconnection of their sense of appreciation and wonder for the blessings that people’s minds tend to neglect or forget. Spiritual rabbis have come up with a practical solution to prevent people from being impeded by their insecurities, fears, and sluggishness. This is through the diversion of attention on what they have, instead of future uncertainties.

 

Scholars and rabbis have even devised a series of short, specific, and meaningful phrases to conquer the moodiness and burden experienced by the brain, thereby allowing an increase of internal energy to affect positivity.

 

Override With Motivational Words

By exploring highly efficient techniques to override psychological tendencies of the brain to worry about the multitude of things regularly, one can be more in control of their thoughts and emotions, leading to more productive and healthier days.

 

The Jews believe that by uttering profound motivational phrases, they can remarkably eliminate their anxiety and avoid mental health counseling. These Hebrew words and phrases can transform stress and worries into a rehabilitated sense of happiness, strength, and mindfulness. Exploring one’s mind by continually telling yourself essential phrases will determine empowerment and confidence in facing life’s daily struggles.

 

Recognizing The Source

Much like any other religion, the Jews believe that there is a higher power known as the Creative Source who is continuously infusing positive energy within every individual and is also present in the environment. Judaism does have numerous ways to picture out “The One” who is mainly responsible for the creation and expression of every living organism on this planet. The need to settle on a specific God is not necessary for it also limits the magnanimous ways to carry one’s burdens, especially when tackling mental health problems.

 

In fact, Judaism strongly emphasizes and humbly acknowledges that focusing on a particular concept or image of God, which makes you conclude of an ultimate answer, is inaccurate on the eternality of the Creative Source.

 

Anxiety Is Not Exclusive

Everybody feels anxious every once in a while, but not everyone can experience anxiety in a magnified, severe manner that functioning healthily and productively can be quite challenging. Race and religion can be dominant contributing factors to increased anxiety, especially when faced with prejudicial society.

 

Jews most definitely have quite a reputation for experiencing anxiety due to the neurotic stereotypes revolving around states and cities within the country. The always-anxious Jewish mom is not a bad thing because worrying about things, people, and possible outcomes are innate specifics to survive and thrive.

 

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A General Option

Anxiety is a condition that affects around 18% of Americans; however, only one-third of those who have anxiety disorders seek help. Sometimes, anxiety is so severe that the abovementioned tactics may no longer work. If that happens, Jew or non-Jew, one can always turn to counseling or therapy.